Many care partners struggle with their choices to be the primary, and sometimes only, care partner for their loved ones. Sometimes, these choices can lead to anger, resentment, stress, depression, exhaustion, and other health issues. It can be difficult to raise your hand and ask for help. The National Adult Day Association can provide good information about what a day program can provide for persons with a dementia such as Alzheimer’s and their care partner. The National Institute of Adult Day Care describes adult day care as a program of individualized services and therapeutic activities in a group setting for adults who are cognitively impaired, physically impaired, socially isolated, frail elderly, in need of assistance with activities of daily living and in need of supervision.
In addition to providing programming and social engagement for persons with dementia, care partners receive a temporary break from the demands of caregiving. Respite caregivers can help alleviate the effects of caregiver stress. There are options available to achieve the well deserved day off. Homecare agencies are available to provide respite in the home allowing the primary care provider a break to get away and de-stress. Adult day services are worth checking out in your community. Call the local senior centers for resource information. Call a home care company and ask about all the options available. It is okay to raise your hand and ask for help.
In addition, many of the Alzheimer’s Association chapters offer as part of their core services care consultations. It’s a grouping of services to assist the person with Alzheimer’s or related dementias and/or their family care partners in planning for, and dealing with, all aspects of the illness experience. Individuals with dementia and their care partners receive one-on-one assistance that will enable them to better manage care and make more informed decisions regarding services and treatments. To request a consultation, call the Alzheimer’s Association helpline at 1-800-272-3900.
For more information visit: www.alz.org